01
Oct
01
Oct
01
Oct
Ours is the age that is proud of machines that think and suspicious of men who try to.
- H. Mumford Jones (via wellsaidblog)

(via goodideaexchange)

01
Oct
The platform itself may not control us but there’s a price of admission: play by the rules or risk irrelevance, which is to say, exclusion from the community. If a tweet falls in the forest and no one favorites it, did it even happen at all?
01
Oct

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart cover Kansas’s anti-gay legislation on The Daily Show.

And you can watch full episodes anytime, anywhere on the Comedy Central app.

Accurate

01
Oct
npr:

Wolves in Wyoming are once again being protected under the Endangered Species Act, just two years after those protections were taken away. A federal judge’s ruling last week found the state’s management plan for the animal “inadequate and un-enforceable.” In February, NPR’s Nate Rott took a comprehensive look at the wolf situation in the Western U.S.
Wolves At The Door
Photo credit: David Gilkey/NPR

npr:

Wolves in Wyoming are once again being protected under the Endangered Species Act, just two years after those protections were taken away. A federal judge’s ruling last week found the state’s management plan for the animal “inadequate and un-enforceable.” In February, NPR’s Nate Rott took a comprehensive look at the wolf situation in the Western U.S.

Wolves At The Door

Photo credit: David Gilkey/NPR

01
Oct
01
Oct
01
Oct
01
Oct
pulitzercenter:

One story the world cannot ignore is the slow and murderous fracturing of Iraq and Syria. In separate projects, Pulitzer Center grantees Sebastian Meyer and James Harkin have been documenting the fallout from the sudden rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL.
Sebastian, in this video report for Voice of America, reports from a church in Iraqi Kurdistan that has become a makeshift refugee camp for Christians fleeing from the onslaught of ISIS. “I don’t think about my future anymore,” a 14-year-old girl tells Sebastian. “I just take everything one day at a time. We want to leave and go abroad because we don’t believe we’ll ever go back home. How much longer do we have stay in this place? How much longer till it’s over?”
Meanwhile, James, reporting from northern Syria for Newsweek, continues to document the plight of more than 130 Kurdish schoolboys who were kidnapped by Islamic State militants last May with the apparent intent of recruiting them into their ranks.
“Long before western politicians identified the Islamic State as Public Enemy No. 1, the Kurds of Northern Syria were fighting a rearguard action against them, almost entirely alone,” writes James. Kobani, the city where the kidnapped boys are from, “has slowly become the epicenter and the crucible of a fight to the death. For over six months, it’s been under a crushing, increasingly desperate siege on three sides by fighters from the Islamic State – and by the Turkish authorities on the fourth.” 
And finally, Pulitzer Center student fellow Selin Thomas, a recent Boston University graduate, is on the Syrian border in Turkey where she filed this Untold Stories dispatch on the plight of refugee children.   

pulitzercenter:

One story the world cannot ignore is the slow and murderous fracturing of Iraq and Syria. In separate projects, Pulitzer Center grantees Sebastian Meyer and James Harkin have been documenting the fallout from the sudden rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL.

Sebastian, in this video report for Voice of America, reports from a church in Iraqi Kurdistan that has become a makeshift refugee camp for Christians fleeing from the onslaught of ISIS. “I don’t think about my future anymore,” a 14-year-old girl tells Sebastian. “I just take everything one day at a time. We want to leave and go abroad because we don’t believe we’ll ever go back home. How much longer do we have stay in this place? How much longer till it’s over?”

Meanwhile, James, reporting from northern Syria for Newsweek, continues to document the plight of more than 130 Kurdish schoolboys who were kidnapped by Islamic State militants last May with the apparent intent of recruiting them into their ranks.

“Long before western politicians identified the Islamic State as Public Enemy No. 1, the Kurds of Northern Syria were fighting a rearguard action against them, almost entirely alone,” writes James. Kobani, the city where the kidnapped boys are from, “has slowly become the epicenter and the crucible of a fight to the death. For over six months, it’s been under a crushing, increasingly desperate siege on three sides by fighters from the Islamic State – and by the Turkish authorities on the fourth.” 

And finally, Pulitzer Center student fellow Selin Thomas, a recent Boston University graduate, is on the Syrian border in Turkey where she filed this Untold Stories dispatch on the plight of refugee children.   

01
Oct

railpass:

Chicago to Oakland by Train: The Rockies

I fucking love the Rockies. If I could just sit on a train going back and forth between Grand Junction and Denver I wouldn’t hesitate. I’ve hiked them and I’ve biked them, but the remoteness of the train route is truly a unique way to experience these mountains.

In one day you’ll pass through the entire range, rarely going over 40mph. And maybe that seems slow to you. If it does I really feel for you. If anything, 40mph is the maximum speed I would consider going through these amazing mountains. Above which, you’d never see any of the views long enough to savor them. I only hope the next time I go through the Rockies I’ll be able to move even slower. Hell, maybe I’ll just stop and never start up again.

01
Oct

' You can go crazy too, but dont ever come back' by Daniel Johnston

' You can go crazy too, but dont ever come back' by Daniel Johnston

(via laika)

01
Oct
All right, then, I’ll go to hell.
-

Mark Twain

(from The adventures of Huckelberry Finn. The first ban of Mark Twain’s American classic in Concord, MA in 1885 called it “trash and suitable only for the slums.”)

Banned Books Week

(via thatlitsite)

(via thatlitsite)

01
Oct
There wasn’t a clear, identifiable emotion within me, except for greed and, possibly, total disgust. I had all the characteristics of a human being - flesh, blood, skin, hair - but my depersonalization was so intense, had gone so deep, that the normal ability to feel compassion had been eradicated, the victim of a slow, purposeful erasure. I was simply imitating reality, a rough resemblance of a human being, with only a dim corner of my mind functioning. Something horrible was happening and yet I couldn’t figure out why—I couldn’t put my finger on it.
-

Bret Easton Ellis

(from American Psycho. Bret Easton Ellis’ controversial classic was banned in Canada in 1991 following its publication, and was described as being, “pure trash, as scummy and mean as anything depicts…”)

Banned Books Week

(via thatlitsite)
01
Oct
How could an organization that monitors its employees’ appearance and regulates how long they can celebrate on the field not pursue, with the same zeal, available video evidence of one of them knocking out his fiancée in an elevator?
-

Ian Crouch on Husain Abdullah and the N.F.L.’s unsportsmanlike conduct.

(via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

About

i am a nerdy rapper. these are the things i think about when i am writing. these are also the things i am writing.